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I find it pretty amazing when I watched the democrats try to take responsibility for the passing of the Civil Rights Act.  Dr. Martin Luther King led many a demonstration in the hopes of having the government enforce the Bill of Rights for all people of the United States.  When the doctor gave his speech in Washington, DC, on that hot August day, fifty years ago, he wasn’t talking about states with republican governors.  He wasn’t referring to districts that were republican. 

In 1963, President Kennedy announced his plans to enact a sweeping supporting legislation for civil rights.  After his assassination, President Johnson decided to do something that his party did not want done.  But to achieve this landmark decision, to get this law done, LBJ approached those who had been championing equal rights, and the rights for every individual to achieve their dreams: the Republican Party.  Although a bunch of southern senators, democrats, filibustered the measure, the republicans managed to get enough votes, working with LBJ, to get this historic measure passed.

Even though the Civil Rights Act was passed in 1964, those southern senators, and southern governors, all democrats, still fought against equality for all.  Governor Wallace of Alabama, a prominent democrat, fought hard to stop the Civil Rights Act, and fought hard against desegregation.  Other prominent democrats, in the north and south, fought against the removal of an institution that had been in place since reconstruction, and was predicated on keeping the black American in “his place”.  Yet, the Republicans fought hard to insure that all men, especially former slaves, black Americans, received equal treatment, and had equal rights under the law.  From Abraham Lincoln to George Bush, Republicans have always worked hard to insure that everyone was treated equally and fair.

The Republican party has always been a staunch defender of the American people, their rights, and their liberties.  We must continue to defend these rights, insuring that our children, and our children’s children, are born free, able to pursue their dreams, with the love of family, and without fear of persecution or trial.

“We Must All Stand Together, Or Assuredly, We Shall All Swing Separate…”

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